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Governor of Guam 2011- 2018

Eddie Baza Calvo (1961 — ), a Republican, was the 13th civilian Governor of Guam. He served for two terms. He was first elected in 2010 by a slim margin and sworn into office in January 2011 having defeated Democrat former Governor Carl T.C. Gutierrez and his running mate former Senator Frank Aguon Jr. in the 2010 gubernatorial election.

He won a second term, this time garnering 63.7 percent of the vote in 2014. Calvo-Tenorio defeated former Governor Carl T.C. Gutierrez and his running mate, attorney Gary Gumataotao. Ray Tenorio, also a former senator, is his Lieutenant Governor. They were sworn into office 5 January 2015 and served their last day 6 January 2019.

Calvo, born 29 August 1961, is the son of Governor Paul McDonald Calvo, who was the Governor of Guam from 1979 until 1983, and Rosa Herrero Baza. Calvo attended Father Duenas Memorial School before moving to California, where he graduated from St. Francis High School in Mountain View, California, in 1979. Calvo earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Notre Dame de Namur University in Belmont, California in 1983.

He is married to Christine Lujan Sonido. The couple has six children: Eddie, Vinson, Rosae, PJ, Melva and Celine.

Career

Before entering politics Calvo worked in the private sector for fifteen years as the general manager of the Pacific Construction Company and the Vice President and General Manager of the Pepsi Bottling Company of Guam.

Calvo was first elected as a Senator in the Guam Legislature in 1998, taking office in 1999. He was elected to five terms in office (with a two-year break after his defeat in 2002). Calvo has served as the Vice Speaker of the Legislature.

In 2002, Calvo ran for Lieutenant Governor of Guam as the running mate of Republican gubernatorial candidate, Speaker Antonio Unpingco. The Unpingco-Calvo ticket, however, was defeated in the Republican primary election by gubernatorial candidate Felix Camacho and Kaleo Moylan, who went on to win the election in the 2002 general election.

By Shannon J. Murphy