General Orders issued in 1899. To go back to the list of General Orders click here.

No. 1

August 16, 1899

General Order No. 1
It is prohibited to sell, issue, or in any way to dispose of any intoxicating spirituous liquors in the island of Guam, or in the contiguous waters, reefs, or lands thereof, or to any person who was not a resident of this island prior to August 7, 1899; and any person convicted of violating this order may be punished by a fine not exceeding $100 (Mexican money), or imprisonment not exceeding one month, or both, on approval of the governor, and the offender’s contraband goods shall be confiscated.

RICHARD P. LEARY, USN
Governor


No. 2

August 16, 1899

General Order No. 2
On and after September 15th, 1899, the importation of whiskey, brandy, rum, gin, aguadiente or of any other intoxicating spirituous liquor into the island of Guam or its contiguous waters, reefs or lands, is prohibited except by a special license issued by the government, and any offender against this order may be punished by fine or imprisonment, or both, upon approval by the governor, and the offender’s contraband goods shall be confiscated.

RICHARD P. LEARY, USN
Governor


No. 3

August 21, 1899

General Order No. 3
For the protection of government interests and as a safeguard for the residents of Guam against the machinations, devices and schemes of speculators and adventurers, it is hereby ordered that all persons who claim ownership of land in this island or its dependencies are prohibited from selling or transferring any portion of such property without first obtaining the consent of the government. Violation of this order may be punished by fine or imprisonment, or both.

RICHARD P. LEARY, USN
Governor


No. 4

August 25, 1899

General Order No. 4
Public Celebrations of feast days of the patron saints of villages, etc. will not be permitted. The church and its members may celebrate their religious feast days within the walls of the church, chapel or private residence, in accordance with regulations for the maintenance of the public peace, and unless, otherwise ordered, the only public holidays recognized will be Sundays, and the holidays authorized by the United States Statute Laws, and by the proclamations of His Excellency, the President of the United States.

RICHARD P. LEARY, USN
Governor


No. 5

September 15, 1899

General Order No. 5
The existing custom of concubinage, rearing families of illegitimate children, is repulsive to ideas of decency, antagonistic to moral advancement, incompatible with the generally recognized customs of civilized society, a violation of the accepted principles of Christianity and a most degrading injustice to the innocent offspring, who is not responsible for the condition of his unfortunate existence.

The aforesaid custom is henceforth prohibited, and is declared to be an offense punishable after November 3rd, 1899, by fine and imprisonment, and all persons in this island so living together out of the bonds of wedlock are commanded to procure from the Government the necessary marriage license and to be married by either the civil or church authorities, or by both, in order that their children may become legitimatized.

Until November 3rd, 1899, the license and the civil ceremony will be free.

RICHARD P. LEARY, USN
Governor


No. 6

October 4, 1899

General Order No. 6
1. Until otherwise ordered, the exportation of cattle, hogs, fowl, eggs, rice, corn and sweet potatoes from this island is hereby forbidden.

2. Articles of food may be delivered to vessels only in sufficient quantities for the subsistence of those on board during their stay in port and their passage to the next port of their destination.

3. The delivery of such articles of food to ships is prohibited without a government permit.

RICHARD P. LEARY, USN
Governor


No. 7

October 4, 1899

General Order No. 7
1. Every inhabitant, who is without a trade or habitual occupation, by means of which he is able to provide for the necessities of himself and family, must plant a quantity of corn, rice, coffee, cocoa, sweet potatoes, or other fruits and vegetables sufficient for that purpose.

2. He must also have at least twelve hens, one cock, and one sow.

3. The land necessary for the provisions of Article 1 is understood to mean that which produces with good results a single article; if it be suitable for two or more articles he must plant as great a quantity as possible, consistent with the means at his disposal, and taking into consideration what is most necessary for the maintenance of life.

4. Citizens who possess no land for planting may solicit from the government that which they may require for this object.

5. When land is one granted it must be cleared cleaned and planted within such a time as the government may deem necessary, period being indicated when the grant is made, the means of the petitioner being taken into consideration.

6. If the land be not cleared at the expiration of the time fixed when the grant was made the person receiving the grant will be considered vagrant unless he prove that he was prevented from accomplishing the work by some good cause.

7. Every part of the island may be utilized for cultivation even though the sites selected be adjacent to cattle ranches. In the latter case it will be obligatory for the planter to enclose his garden patch with fences to protect them from damage by cattle.

8. Those who, by virtue of this provision have their plantation near cattle ranches cannot claim damages for injuries caused by cattle if it can be proved that the plantations were not properly protected by enclosures.

9. Henceforth lands granted for pastures or plantations may be utilized by their possessors for stock farming or for agriculture, according to the nature of the soil, with the condition that they be properly fenced in; so that he who wishes to start a stock farm will be obliged, before taking his cattle thither, to fence in the territory where they are to graze, being responsible for the damage that may cause to the crops of neighbors for lack of fences of proper car.

Captains of towns and inspectors of crops will report monthly in writing concerning the progress of the plantations and other matters referred to this order.

RICHARD P. LEARY, USN
Governor


No. 8

November 1, 1899

General Order No. 8
1. On and after November 3, 1899, it is prohibited to import or to sell, issue, provide or in any way to dispose of any intoxicating stimulant (liquid, gelatinous or solid) in the island of Guam, or in the contiguous waters, reefs or lands thereof, to any person residing or visiting within the limits of the above stated territory, except by a special license issued by the government, and any person convicted of violating this order may be punished for the first offense by a fine, not exceeding $100 (Mexican money), or imprisonment not exceeding thirty days, or both, and for each succeeding offense the penalty may be doubled, on approval of the governor, and for each conviction the offender’s contraband goods shall be confiscated.

2. Residents or visitors in this island are forbidden to purchase or procure any intoxicating stimulant referred to in this order except by special permission of the Government, and any person who violates this order will be punished at the discretion of the local authorities.

3. Drunkenness, the chief source of all crime and trouble in this island, must and shall cease.

RICHARD P. LEARY, USN
Governor


No. 9

December 1, 1899

General Order No. 9
1. Owners of dogs must procure a license from the government, to be paid annually, beginning the 1st of January 1900.

2. Animals, large or small, must not be permitted to run loose in the roads or streets, nor to encroach on the property of neighbors.

3. Owners of animals will be held responsible for the enforcement of this order, and for its violation will be liable to damages and the confiscation of the offending animals.

RICHARD P. LEARY, USN
Governor


To go back to the list of General Orders click here.