Guam Hymn

English and CHamoru verses
Audio Sample of the Guam Hymn

Verse 1:
STAND YE GUAMANIANS FOR YOUR COUNTRY
AND SING HER PRAISE FROM SHORE TO SHORE
FOR HER HONOR, FOR HER GLORY
EXALT OUR ISLAND FOREVER MORE.
FOR HER HONOR, FOR HER GLORY
EXALT OUR ISLAND FOREVER MORE.

Verse 2:
MAY EVERLASTING PEACE REIGN O’ER US
MAY HEAVEN’S BLESSING TO US COME
AGAINST ALL PERILS, DO NOT FORSAKE US
GOD PROTECT OUR ISLE OF GUAM
AGAINST ALL PERILS, DO NOT FORSAKE US
GOD PROTECT OUR ISLE OF GUAM.

Fanohge CHamoru

Audio Sample of the Fanohge CHamoru

Verse 1:
FANOHGE CHAMORU PUT I TANO’ TA
KANTA I MATUNA-NA GI TODU I LUGAT
PARA I ONRA, PARA I GLORIA
ABIBA I ISLA SINPARAT.
PARA I ONRA, PARA I GLORIA
ABIBA I ISLA SINPARAT.

Verse 2:
TODU I TIEMPO I PAS PARA HITA
YAN GINEN I LANGET NA BENDISION
KONTRA I PILIGRU NA’FANSAFO
HAM YU’OS PRUTEHI I ISLAN GUAM
KONTRA I PILIGRU NA’FANSAFO
HAM YU’OS PRUTEHI I ISLAN GUAM.

Audio recording credits

Editor’s Note: “Guam Hymn” and “Fanohge CHamoru” from Oh Dear Guam. Stel-Star Productions Studio, 1991. Permission to use was given by Flora Baza.
Sung by:
Flora Baza
Telo Taitague
Danny Orlino
Remy & Jocelyn Toves
Boya Quichocho
Frank “Bokonggo” Pangelinan
Mike & Antonette Duenas
Marcia San Nicolas

Historical perspective

The composition of the Guam Hymn was greatly influenced by the socio-cultural and political history of pre-World War II Guam during the Naval Era. It was a time when the island was administered by Naval governors and the speaking and writing of the CHamoru language was discouraged.

It was first written in English in 1919 and translated to CHamoru in the 1970s when CHamorus were experiencing a resurgence of pride in the language and culture.

The Guam hymn, or Kantikun Guahan, more commonly known as Fanohge CHamoru, was written and composed by Dr. Ramon Manilisay Sablan, the island’s first CHamoru medical doctor, and an outspoken CHamoru rights activist. Fanohge CHamoru was adopted as the official song of the territory in 1919 and translated into Guam’s native language, CHamoru by Lagrimas Leon Guerrero Untalan in 1974.

CHamorus, the indigenous people of Guam, have long fought for political independence from the United States Naval government. The struggle for self-determination continues after the passing of the Organic Act in 1950, which gave CHamorus a limited form of self-government, United States citizenship and transferred the power of the government from the Navy to the US Department of Interior.